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 ioctl(2) -- control device
    ioctl() performs a variety of functions on character special files (devices), or regular files and directories on VxFS file systems. The write-ups of various devices in Section (7) discuss how ioctl() applies to them. The type of arg is dependent on the specific ioctl() call, as described in Section (7). request is made up of several fields which encode the size and direction of the argument (refe...
 iscomsec(2) -- check if the system has been converted to a trusted system.
    iscomsec returns a zero (0) if the system is not a trusted system. If the system has been converted to a trusted system, iscomsec returns a one (1).
 kill(2) -- send a signal to a process or a group of processes
    The kill() system call sends a signal to a process or a group of processes, as specified by pid. The signal to be sent is specified by sig and is either one from the list given in signal(2), or 0. The raise() system call sends a signal to the executing program. The signal to be sent is specified by sig and is either one from the list given in signal(2), or 0. If sig is 0 (the null signal), error c...
 killpg(2) -- 4.2 BSD-compatible process control facilities
    These calls simulate (and are provided for backward compatibility with) functions of the same name in the 4.2 Berkeley Software Distribution. This version of setpgrp() is equivalent to the system call setpgid(pid, pid, , pgrp) (see ) (see setpgid(2)). This version of getpgrp() is equivalent to the system call getpgrp2(pid) (see pid) (see ) (see getpid(2)). killpg() is equivalent to the system call...
 lchown(2) -- change owner and group of a file
    The chown() system call changes the user and group ownership of a file. path points to the path name of a file. chown() sets the owner ID and group ID of the file to the numeric values contained in owner and group respectively. A value of UID_NO_CHANGE or GID_NO_CHANGE can be specified in owner or group to leave unchanged the file's owner ID or group ID, respectively. Note that owner and group sh...
 link(2) -- link to a file
    The link() system call creates a new link (directory entry) for the existing file. path1 points to a path name naming an existing file. path2 points to a path name naming the new directory entry to be created.
 lio_listio(2) -- start a list of asynchronous I/O operations
    The lio_listio() function allows the calling process to request a list of asynchronous I/O operations with a single function call. The function call returns when all operation requests have been enqueued for processing. At this point, processing of the operations may proceed concurrently with execution of the calling process or thread. The list argument is an array of nent pointers to aiocb struct...
 listen(2) -- listen for connections on a socket
    To accept connections, a socket is first created using socket(), a queue for incoming connections is activated using listen(), and then connections are accepted using accept(). listen() applies only to unconnected sockets of type SOCK_STREAM. Except for AF_VME_LINK, if the socket has not been bound to a local port before listen() is invoked, the system automatically binds a local port for the sock...
 lockf(2) -- provide semaphores and record locking on files
    The lockf() function allows regions of a file to be used as semaphores (advisory locks) or restricts access to only the locking process (enforcement-mode record locks). Other processes that attempt to access the locked resource either return an error or sleep until the resource becomes unlocked. All locks for a process are released upon the first close of the file, even if the process still has th...
 lockf64(2) -- non-POSIX standard API interfaces to support large files
    New API's to support large files in 32-bit applications. These API interfaces are not a part of the POSIX standard and may be removed in the future. creat64() The creat64() function returns a file descriptor which can be used to grow the file past 2 GB if desired. All other functional behaviors, returns, and errors are identical to creat(). fstat64() The fstat64() function is identical to fstat()...
 lseek(2) -- move read/write file pointer; seek
    lseek() sets the file pointer associated with the file descriptor as follows: + If whence is SEEK_SET, the pointer is set to offset bytes. + If whence is SEEK_CUR, the pointer is set to its current location plus offset. + If whence is SEEK_END, the pointer is set to the size of the file plus offset. These symbolic constants are defined in .
 lseek64(2) -- non-POSIX standard API interfaces to support large files
    New API's to support large files in 32-bit applications. These API interfaces are not a part of the POSIX standard and may be removed in the future. creat64() The creat64() function returns a file descriptor which can be used to grow the file past 2 GB if desired. All other functional behaviors, returns, and errors are identical to creat(). fstat64() The fstat64() function is identical to fstat()...
 lstat(2) -- get symbolic link status
    The lstat() function has the same effect as stat(), except when path refers to a symbolic link. In that case lstat() returns information about the link, while stat() returns information about the file the link references. For symbolic links, the st_mode member will contain meaningful information when used with the file type macros, and the st_size member will contain the length of the pathname con...
 lstat64(2) -- non-POSIX standard API interfaces to support large files
    New API's to support large files in 32-bit applications. These API interfaces are not a part of the POSIX standard and may be removed in the future. creat64() The creat64() function returns a file descriptor which can be used to grow the file past 2 GB if desired. All other functional behaviors, returns, and errors are identical to creat(). fstat64() The fstat64() function is identical to fstat()...
 lsync(2) -- update disk
    sync() causes all information in memory that should be on disk to be written out. This includes modified file system meta-data and delayed block I/O. It should be used by commands and programs that examine a file system, such as fsck, df, etc. It is mandatory before a shutdown. The writing, although scheduled, is not necessarily complete upon return from sync. In some HP-UX systems, sync() may be ...
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