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  man pages->HP-UX 11i man pages              
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 creat64(2) -- non-POSIX standard API interfaces to support large files
    New API's to support large files in 32-bit applications. These API interfaces are not a part of the POSIX standard and may be removed in the future. creat64() The creat64() function returns a file descriptor which can be used to grow the file past 2 GB if desired. All other functional behaviors, returns, and errors are identical to creat(). fstat64() The fstat64() function is identical to fstat()...
 dup(2) -- duplicate an open file descriptor
    fildes is a file descriptor obtained from a creat(), open(), dup(), fcntl(), or pipe() system call. dup() returns a new file descriptor having the following in common with the original: + Same open file (or pipe). + Same file pointer (i.e., both file descriptors share one file pointer). + Same access mode (read, write or read/write). + Same file status flags (see fcntl(2), F_DUPFD). The new file d...
 dup2(2) -- duplicate an open file descriptor to a specific slot
    fildes is a file descriptor obtained from a creat(), open(), dup(), fcntl(), or pipe() system call. fildes2 is a non-negative integer less than the maximum value allowed for file descriptors. dup2() causes fildes2 to refer to the same file as fildes. If fildes2 refers to an already open file, the open file is closed first. The file descriptor returned by dup2() has the following in common with fil...
 errno(2) -- error indicator for function calls
    Many functions in the HP-UX operating system indicate an error condition by returning an otherwise out-of-range value (usually -1). Most of these functions set the symbol errno, that is defined in errno.h, to a nonzero code value that more specifically identifies the particular error condition that was encountered. In most cases, the manpages for functions that set errno list those errno values an...
 exec(2) -- execute a file
    The exec*() system calls, in all their forms, load a program from an ordinary, executable file into the current process, replacing the current program. The path or file argument refers to either an executable object file or a file of data for an interpreter. In the latter case, the file of data is also called a script file. Hewlett-Packard Company - 1 - HP-UX 11i Version 2: August 2003 exec(2) exe...
 execl(2) -- execute a file
    The exec*() system calls, in all their forms, load a program from an ordinary, executable file into the current process, replacing the current program. The path or file argument refers to either an executable object file or a file of data for an interpreter. In the latter case, the file of data is also called a script file. Hewlett-Packard Company - 1 - HP-UX 11i Version 2: August 2003 exec(2) exe...
 execle(2) -- execute a file
    The exec*() system calls, in all their forms, load a program from an ordinary, executable file into the current process, replacing the current program. The path or file argument refers to either an executable object file or a file of data for an interpreter. In the latter case, the file of data is also called a script file. Hewlett-Packard Company - 1 - HP-UX 11i Version 2: August 2003 exec(2) exe...
 execlp(2) -- execute a file
    The exec*() system calls, in all their forms, load a program from an ordinary, executable file into the current process, replacing the current program. The path or file argument refers to either an executable object file or a file of data for an interpreter. In the latter case, the file of data is also called a script file. Hewlett-Packard Company - 1 - HP-UX 11i Version 2: August 2003 exec(2) exe...
 execv(2) -- execute a file
    The exec*() system calls, in all their forms, load a program from an ordinary, executable file into the current process, replacing the current program. The path or file argument refers to either an executable object file or a file of data for an interpreter. In the latter case, the file of data is also called a script file. Hewlett-Packard Company - 1 - HP-UX 11i Version 2: August 2003 exec(2) exe...
 execve(2) -- execute a file
    The exec*() system calls, in all their forms, load a program from an ordinary, executable file into the current process, replacing the current program. The path or file argument refers to either an executable object file or a file of data for an interpreter. In the latter case, the file of data is also called a script file. Hewlett-Packard Company - 1 - HP-UX 11i Version 2: August 2003 exec(2) exe...
 execvp(2) -- execute a file
    The exec*() system calls, in all their forms, load a program from an ordinary, executable file into the current process, replacing the current program. The path or file argument refers to either an executable object file or a file of data for an interpreter. In the latter case, the file of data is also called a script file. Hewlett-Packard Company - 1 - HP-UX 11i Version 2: August 2003 exec(2) exe...
 exit(2) -- terminate process
    exit() terminates the calling process and passes status to the system for inspection, see wait(2). Returning from main in a C program has the same effect as exit(); the status value is the function value returned by main (this value is undefined if main does not take care to return a value or to call exit() explicitly). If the calling process is multithreaded, all threads/lightweight process in th...
 fchdir(2) -- change working directory
    chdir() and fchdir() cause a directory pointed to by path or fildes to become the current working directory, the starting point for path searches of path names not beginning with /. path points to the path name of a directory. fildes is an open file descriptor of a directory. For a directory to become the current working directory, a process must have execute (search) access to the directory.
 fchmod(2) -- change file mode access permissions
    The chmod() and fchmod() system calls set the access permission portion of the file's mode according to the bit pattern contained in mode. path points to a path name naming a file. fildes is a file descriptor. The following symbolic constants representing the access permission bits are defined with the indicated values in and are used to construct the mode argument. The value of mode...
 fchown(2) -- change owner and group of a file
    The chown() system call changes the user and group ownership of a file. path points to the path name of a file. chown() sets the owner ID and group ID of the file to the numeric values contained in owner and group respectively. A value of UID_NO_CHANGE or GID_NO_CHANGE can be specified in owner or group to leave unchanged the file's owner ID or group ID, respectively. Note that owner and group sh...
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