*nix Documentation Project
·  Home
 +   man pages
·  Linux HOWTOs
·  FreeBSD Tips
·  *niX Forums

  man pages->HP-UX 11i man pages              
Title
Content
Arch
Section
 
 utimes(2) -- set file access and modification times
    The utimes() function sets the access and modification times of the file pointed to by the path argument to the value of the times argument. The utimes() function allows time specifications accurate to the microsecond. For utimes(), the times argument is an array of timeval structures. The first array member represents the date and time of last access, and the second member represents the date and...
 vfork(2) -- spawn new process; share virtual memory
    vfork() can be used to create new processes without fully copying the address space of the old process. If a forked process is simply going to do an exec() (see exec(2)), the data space copied from the parent to the child by fork() is not used. This is particularly inefficient in a paged environment, making vfork particularly useful. Depending upon the size of the parent's data space, vfork() can...
 vfsmount(2) -- mount a file system
    The vfsmount() system call attaches a file system to a directory. After a successful return, references to directory dir refer to the root directory of the newly mounted file system. dir is a pointer to a null-terminated string containing a path name. dir must exist already, and must be a directory. Its old contents are inaccessible while the file system is mounted. type indicates the type of the ...
 wait(2) -- wait for child process to stop or terminate
    The wait() and waitpid() functions shall obtain status information pertaining to one of the caller's child processes. Various options permit status information to be obtained for child processes that have terminated or stopped. If status information is available for two or more child processes, the order in which their status is reported is unspecified. The wait() function shall suspend execution...
 wait3(2) -- wait for child process to change state
    The wait3() and wait4() functions allow the calling process to obtain various status information for a caller's child process based on the options specified. If status information is available for two or more child processes, the order of which process to report status on is not defined. The wait4() function is similar to wait3(), except that wait4() waits for a specific child as indicated by the...
 wait4(2) -- wait for child process to change state
    The wait3() and wait4() functions allow the calling process to obtain various status information for a caller's child process based on the options specified. If status information is available for two or more child processes, the order of which process to report status on is not defined. The wait4() function is similar to wait3(), except that wait4() waits for a specific child as indicated by the...
 waitid(2) -- wait for child process to change state
    The waitid() function suspends the calling process until one of its children changes state. It records the current state of a child in the structure pointed to by infop. If a child process changed state prior to the call to waitid(), waitid() returns immediately. The idtype and id arguments are used to specify which children waitid() will wait for. If idtype is P_PID, waitid() will wait for the ch...
 waitpid(2) -- wait for child process to stop or terminate
    The wait() and waitpid() functions shall obtain status information pertaining to one of the caller's child processes. Various options permit status information to be obtained for child processes that have terminated or stopped. If status information is available for two or more child processes, the order in which their status is reported is unspecified. The wait() function shall suspend execution...
 write(2) -- write on a file
    The write() function attempts to write nbyte bytes from the buffer pointed to by buf to the file associated with the open file descriptor, fildes. If nbyte is 0, write() will return 0 and have no other results if the file is a regular file. Otherwise, the results are unspecified. On a regular file or other file capable of seeking, the actual writing of data proceeds from the position in the file i...
 writev(2) -- write on a file
    The write() function attempts to write nbyte bytes from the buffer pointed to by buf to the file associated with the open file descriptor, fildes. If nbyte is 0, write() will return 0 and have no other results if the file is a regular file. Otherwise, the results are unspecified. On a regular file or other file capable of seeking, the actual writing of data proceeds from the position in the file i...
 _exit(2) -- terminate process
    exit() terminates the calling process and passes status to the system for inspection, see wait(2). Returning from main in a C program has the same effect as exit(); the status value is the function value returned by main (this value is undefined if main does not take care to return a value or to call exit() explicitly). If the calling process is multithreaded, all threads/lightweight process in th...
 __pset_rtctl(2) -- real-time processor set control
    HP-UX Processor Sets allow a subset of processors in the system to be isolated for exclusive use by specified threads and processes. Only the threads bound to a processor set can execute on processors in that processor set (see pset_create(2)). The __pset_rtctl() function extends processor set functionality for real-time applications to minimize operating system activities in a processor set. A pr...
 ApplicationShell(3) -- The ApplicationShell widget class
    ApplicationShell is used as the main top-level window for an application. An application should have more than one ApplicationShell only if it implements multiple logical applications.
 atexit(3) -- register a function to be called at program termination
    atexit() registers the function func to be called, without arguments, at normal program termination. Functions registered by atexit() are called in reverse order of registration. An atexit() call during exit processing is always unsuccessful. The number of registered functions should not exceed ATEXIT_MAX as specified in . When necessary, crt0() or dld.sl() (see crt0(3) and dld.sl(5)) re...
 audit_intro(3) -- Introduction to the DCE Audit API runtime.
    This introduction gives general information about the DCE Audit Application Programming Interface (API) and an overview of the following parts of the DCE Audit API runtime: + Runtime services + Environment variables + Data types and structures + Permissions required
<<  [Prev]  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  
113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  [Next]  >>
Copyright © 2004-2005 DeniX Solutions SRL
newsletter delivery service