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  man pages->HP-UX 11i man pages              
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Section
 
 stream(2) -- STREAMS enhancements to standard system calls
    The open(), close(), read(), readv(), write(), writev(), ioctl(), select(), and signal() system calls are enhanced to support STREAMS. The new functionality is described below for each system call.
 stty(2) -- control terminal device (Bell Version 6 compatibility)
    For certain status settings and status inquiries about terminal devices, the functions stty() and gtty() are equivalent to ioctl(fildes, TIOCSETP, argp) and ioctl(fildes, TIOCGETP, argp) respectively (see ioctl(2) and termio(7).
 swapcontext(2) -- manipulate user contexts
    The makecontext() function modifies the context specified by ucp, which has been initialized using getcontext(). When this context is resumed using swapcontext() or setcontext(), program execution continues by calling func(), passing it the arguments that follow argc in the makecontext() call. Before a call is made to makecontext(), the context being modified should have a stack allocated for it. ...
 swapon(2) -- add swap space for interleaved paging/swapping
    The swapon() system call makes a block device or a directory named path available to the system for paging and swapping. priority indicates the order in which the swap space from the device or file system is used. Space is taken from the lower-priority systems first. swapon() can be used only by users who have appropriate privileges. If path names a block device file swapon() makes it available to...
 symlink(2) -- make symbolic link to a file
    The symlink() function creates a symbolic link. Its name is the pathname pointed to by path2, which must be a pathname that does not name an existing file or symbolic link. The contents of the symbolic link are the string pointed to by path1.
 sync(2) -- update disk
    sync() causes all information in memory that should be on disk to be written out. This includes modified file system meta-data and delayed block I/O. It should be used by commands and programs that examine a file system, such as fsck, df, etc. It is mandatory before a shutdown. The writing, although scheduled, is not necessarily complete upon return from sync. In some HP-UX systems, sync() may be ...
 sysconf(2) -- get configurable system variables
    The sysconf() system call provides a way for applications to determine the current value of a configurable limit or variable. The name argument represents the system variable being queried. The following table lists the configuration variable name, the associated value for the name argument that is used in the sysconf() call and the value returned: Variable Value for name Value Returned __________...
 sysfs(2) -- get file system type information
    sysfs is used to return information about the file system types configured in the system. The number arguments accepted by sysfs varies and depends on the opcode. The current recognized opcodes and their functions are: GETFSIND Translate fsname, a null-terminated file-system type identifier, into a file-system type index. GETFSTYP Translate fs_index, a file-system type index, into a null-terminate...
 time(2) -- get time
    time() returns the value of time in seconds since the Epoch. If tloc is not a null pointer, the return value is also assigned to the object to which it points.
 timers(2) -- timer operations
    timer_create() The timer_create() function creates a per-process timer using the specified clock, clock_id, as the timing base. The timer_create() function returns, in the location referenced by timerid, a timer ID of type timer_t used to identify the timer in timer requests. This timer ID will be unique within the calling process until the timer is deleted. The particular clock, clock_id, is defi...
 timer_create(2) -- timer operations
    timer_create() The timer_create() function creates a per-process timer using the specified clock, clock_id, as the timing base. The timer_create() function returns, in the location referenced by timerid, a timer ID of type timer_t used to identify the timer in timer requests. This timer ID will be unique within the calling process until the timer is deleted. The particular clock, clock_id, is defi...
 timer_delete(2) -- timer operations
    timer_create() The timer_create() function creates a per-process timer using the specified clock, clock_id, as the timing base. The timer_create() function returns, in the location referenced by timerid, a timer ID of type timer_t used to identify the timer in timer requests. This timer ID will be unique within the calling process until the timer is deleted. The particular clock, clock_id, is defi...
 timer_getoverrun(2) -- timer operations
    timer_create() The timer_create() function creates a per-process timer using the specified clock, clock_id, as the timing base. The timer_create() function returns, in the location referenced by timerid, a timer ID of type timer_t used to identify the timer in timer requests. This timer ID will be unique within the calling process until the timer is deleted. The particular clock, clock_id, is defi...
 timer_gettime(2) -- timer operations
    timer_create() The timer_create() function creates a per-process timer using the specified clock, clock_id, as the timing base. The timer_create() function returns, in the location referenced by timerid, a timer ID of type timer_t used to identify the timer in timer requests. This timer ID will be unique within the calling process until the timer is deleted. The particular clock, clock_id, is defi...
 timer_settime(2) -- timer operations
    timer_create() The timer_create() function creates a per-process timer using the specified clock, clock_id, as the timing base. The timer_create() function returns, in the location referenced by timerid, a timer ID of type timer_t used to identify the timer in timer requests. This timer ID will be unique within the calling process until the timer is deleted. The particular clock, clock_id, is defi...
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